Open Access & Public Access

“Open Access is the free, immediate, online availability of research articles combined with the rights to use these articles fully in the digital environment. Open Access is the needed modern update for the communication of research that fully utilizes the Internet for what it was originally built to do—accelerate research.” – Scholarly Publishing & Academic Resources Coalition

The PSU Library offers many services to support Open Access work for PSU-generated scholarship:

The Open Access movement has resulted in institutional policies and mandates requiring authors to make their works open access. Some examples include:

  • PSU Faculty Senate Open Access Policy
  • PSU Library Faculty Open Access Resolution
  • ROARMAP: Registry of Open Access Repositories Mandatory Archiving Policies
  • Plan S the European Union funder initiative requiring that, from 2020, scientific publications that result from research funded by public grants must be published in compliant Open Access journals or platforms
  • OPEN Government Data Act government-wide mandate requiring U.S. federal agencies to publish all non-sensitive government information including federally-funded research as open data using standardized, non-proprietary formats.
  • Plan U proposes the most effective way to achieve open scholarship is through the use of preprint servers and institutional repositories to provide access to scholarly content.

Your subject librarian can provide support connecting you to more information about open access services at the library and beyond.

Public Access

Public Access refers to making publicly funded works readily available to the public. In the United States, policy mandates federal funding agencies with a research budget of more than $100M to develop and implement plans to make publicly funded research freely available. There are three important distinctions between Open Access and Public Access:

  • Public Access does not require that final, published versions of works are made available, but rather the submitted or accepted versions of articles;
  • Public Access does not require use licenses to allow for modification and re-use of works;
  • Works may be embargoed for up to 24 months from publication.

For more information about Public Access, please see: